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Thread: Unix Testing

  1. #1
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    Unix Testing

    I want to learn the basic testing tips and methods for jumping into Unix based testing.
    Please help.



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    Amit Mathur
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    A1/26 Mohan Coperative,
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    Amit Mathur
    Quality Analyist

  2. #2
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    Re: Unix Testing

    Be more specific. What are type of Unix based testing do you need to perform?

    Scott

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  3. #3
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    Re: Unix Testing

    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by amtu:
    I want to learn the basic testing tips and methods for jumping into Unix based testing.
    Please help.
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
    To state the obvious, you should learn something about UNIX. If you don't currently have access to a UNIX system, LINUX for the PC platform is free (or quite cheap if you buy it on CD from Mandrake, Suse, Redhat, etc.).

    You need to at least understand basic file and directory commands and concepts, and should learn a basic text editor such as vi or emacs. Learning how to create shell scripts (sh, csh, and/or ksh) is very useful, and learning Perl can take you to the next level (or 2 or 3). Understanding regular expressions (regexp) can be very useful in many testing activities.

    And don't forget the most important UNIX command: "man" (the help command, try "man man" if you don't know anything about it).


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    Charles Reace

    charles{DOT}reace{AT}verizon{DOT}net
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    [i]...Sound trumpets! Every trumpet in the host! / Sixty thousand, on these words, sound, so high the mountains sound, and the valleys resound.&lt;/i] (The Song of Roland)

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    Re: Unix Testing

    Hi Charles,
    I actually have covered some of the basics-like the file structure,vi editor and shell programming in Unix-pls advise how to get a body of knowledge on what Unix testing is and how it is done.
    I am not new to QA-I am a manual tester and have done some back end testing too with Terra Term(a unix based platform which integrates Informix).
    Thanks and regards,
    WR

    ------------------


    [This message has been edited by winrunner67 (edited 03-05-2002).]

  5. #5
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    Re: Unix Testing

    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by winrunner67:
    Hi Charles,
    I actually have covered some of the basics-like the file structure,vi editor and shell programming in Unix-pls advise how to get a body of knowledge on what Unix testing is and how it is done.
    I am not new to QA-I am a manual tester and have done some back end testing too with Terra Term(a unix based platform which integrates Informix).
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Well, it sounds like you're off to a decent start, then. The first thing that jumps to mind is that anything on a UNIX platform these days is likely to be heavily involved with a database, so brushing up your SQL skills is very useful. Looking into automated tools such as LoadRunner (from Mercury) or Expect/Tcl (open source) might be useful. And since you have some shell scripting, I'd strongly suggest going the next step and learning Perl - it has all sorts of uses.

    Learning some sysadmin stuff is always useful, particularly user/group permissions, and anything you can learn about networking can't hurt.

    ------------------
    Charles Reace

    charles{DOT}reace{AT}verizon{DOT}net
    web site | [url=http://www.ebookworm.us/[/url]

    [i]...Sound trumpets! Every trumpet in the host! / Sixty thousand, on these words, sound, so high the mountains sound, and the valleys resound.&lt;/i] (The Song of Roland)

 

 

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