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  1. #1
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    Requirements-based Test Coverage

    Does anyone having an idea that how to implement Requirement based Test Coverage.
    Umesh Arya

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    Re: Requirements-based Test Coverage

    Easy. Do you use any kind the traceability matrix (requirements to specifications, code, test cases,...) ? If yes you already have amost all you need. If not, try to define one, at least from requirements to test cases. You should have some information on this. When you're developing the test plan you do consider the requirements ?
    Don't worry, be Happy!

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    Re: Requirements-based Test Coverage

    So Daniel,
    Do you mean that if we have 100% testcase and requirements mapping in tracebility matrix, we have 100% Requirement based Test coverage (if we are executing all test cases) ?
    Umesh Arya

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    Re: Requirements-based Test Coverage

    While I can't answer for Daniel, I would say that the answer to the question is "Yes".

    However, I would also note that it it possible to have 100% testcase and requirements coverage AND NOT have 100% code or 100% path coverage.

    Sadly, one can have 100% coverage (select most any attribute) and still not have covered all of the possibilities. The number of scenarios is close to infinite.

    Risk assessment and process are other key elements. Are the highest risks receiving the most attention? Does the process have the right mix of testing methods (review, white box, black box, performance/load, and etc.)?
    Michael L. Hovan
    mrschovan@verizon.net

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    Re: Requirements-based Test Coverage

    As Micheal said the answer is "Yes" but this would not help you much. It's only a necessary condition (if you have no scope exceptions defined in your test plan). You could go deeper and make the same analyses for different test stages, test types,... You could measure the number od test cases/... per area/requirement and evaluate this compared with the risk assigned to each area/requirement
    Don't worry, be Happy!

  6. #6
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    Re: Requirements-based Test Coverage

    I agree with other posts here. Using a traceability matrix will ensure 100% requirements
    coverage, in that every business requirement will have tests associated with it. But those may or may not completely test each requirement.

    100% requirements coverage does not ensure 100% code coverage, nor does it necessarily cover every path in every module.

    The issue is the completeness and efficacy of the requirements document. If everything is not documented in sufficient detail, the tests will also lack sufficient detail.

    There have been several studies done that suggest a mixture of white box testing (testing each path, done by development), static testing (walthrough of specification documents and/or code walkthroughs), and system testing by an outside party (QA Testing) consistently find over 90% of all error...

    - Linda

  7. #7
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    Re: Requirements-based Test Coverage

    Thanks to all of you for your suggestions.

    From your suggestions, I got an idea that only Requirements based test coverage is not sufficient and we must go for the proper blend of Requirements based test coverage and Code coverage.

    Will code coverage alone can serve a purpose? (I am probably expecting an answer "No")
    Umesh Arya

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    Re: Requirements-based Test Coverage

    You learn very fast. My anwer would be 'No',indeed.

    Don't forget the risk part of testing. You would never be able to test 100% of the application (all posible cases), so risks would be a good indicator where to put more effort.

    Also, it's highly dependant on the testing type/phase you're talking about. Code coverage for Unit Testing it's OK, but would you try to use it for UAT ?
    Don't worry, be Happy!

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    Re: Requirements-based Test Coverage

    We are achieving around 80% coverage without a code coverage tool. We have not had a major field defect now for several years. That being said, we will probably have one today, however, when I worked as a Government tester we used a Cyclomatic Complexity tool which for one thing gave us the complexity of each module in the application, those approaching a 10, which means there are 10 possible paths through the module, were fair game for increased testing. As a 10 indicates a module which is over used and liable for failure as well as being hard to maintain. Of course we shouldn't exploit an application like that, but we did. Shame on us. I have pleaded to get such a tool here and almost got it into the budget this year, but, Noooo! It's too expensive and would require a special build of the application to test with. I'll get it some day and when I do, watch out development!
    Personal Comment

    Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm.
    ~ Winston Churchill ~


    ...Rich Wagner

 

 

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