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  1. #1
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    Deming\'s 14 points for Quality Management Systems in relation to Software

    Hi all, I was wondering if anyone would be able to give me a hand on how Dr. Edward Deming's 14 points for quality management systems could be related to software development. A web address or something? Or if anyone wants to have a discussion 'bout it, that'd be great as well. Thanks in advance to anyone who helps.

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    Re: Deming\'s 14 points for Quality Management Systems in relation to Software

    One thought that pops to mind would be to do a web search for "Boris Beizer" and "Software is Different". As I recall, he makes some interesting points in this essay that show how it is difficult to make an exact comparison between the creation of software products and the manufacturing of "normal" products. Thus one might extend this to Demming's principles, which being developed with things such as automotive production in mind, might be difficult to at least totally relate to software development and quality.

    (I'm not saying his 14 points are not applicable at all, just that they may not be 100% transferable to software.)
    web site | [url=http://www.ebookworm.us/[/url]

    [i]...Sound trumpets! Every trumpet in the host! / Sixty thousand, on these words, sound, so high the mountains sound, and the valleys resound.</i] (The Song of Roland)

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    Re: Deming\'s 14 points for Quality Management Systems in relation to Software

    And here is another article to consider regarding the difference between a S/W "manufacturing" process versus other manufacturing processes.
    web site | [url=http://www.ebookworm.us/[/url]

    [i]...Sound trumpets! Every trumpet in the host! / Sixty thousand, on these words, sound, so high the mountains sound, and the valleys resound.</i] (The Song of Roland)

  4. #4
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    Re: Deming\'s 14 points for Quality Management Systems in relation to Software

    The article is interesting, but the author makes a misstep that I think is important. He seems to think that in manufacturing, after a final product design is established, that engineering never sees the product again. He states that software development should follow the model of manufactured product development in which repeated iterations are carried out until the final design is reached.

    I disagree. In manufacturing, engineering has interest in how the product is performing out in the field; assessing the market acceptance and planning changes to the product. And of course, in a regular manufacturing run quality engineers are interested to know where any defects in manufacturing are coming from.

    The article takes to task the use of words 'construction' and so on and points out what is different in software development vs. building a house. Again I think architects and structural engineers have a great amount of knowledge based on studying the performance and perceived usefulness of what has been built already.

    All in all I find that there are not many comparisons that can't be made between software and manufacturing. Most manufacturing environments I've been in had no better idea of how long a new product would take to create than a new release of software - the difference is that you usually see a prototype of a car before the real thing comes out - there is some idea already of what it will take and when the car will be in production. This as opposed to rash promises made by software companies without exploring the concepts first. This falls back on a largely immature management in the industry, not on something being different.

    I could go on, but my point is that software is not _that_ different as many seem to think, it is just poorly managed.

  5. #5
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    Re: Deming\'s 14 points for Quality Management Systems in relation to Software

    Originally posted by SteveC:
    I could go on, but my point is that software is not _that_ different as many seem to think, it is just poorly managed.
    <font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica">I could not agree more. For the last few years, I have been mixing concepts and ideas from assembly lines (Ford) TQM (Toyota) and Jit (Dell) in a software production environment.

    Also, this is also a people/cultural issue.

    The managers that should be encouraging these changes are the ones that stop them.

    They can not risk that upper management realizes that all the "managers" that came before messed things up and starts wondering why things did not happen before.

    Especially if they are further up in the corporate ladder.

  6. #6
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    Re: Deming\'s 14 points for Quality Management Systems in relation to Software

    This is the DEMING Principles as applied to software Dr. W Edward Deming’s 14 Quality Principles
    Shivkumar
    Introduction
    Dr. W Edward Deming has defined 14 Principles for Quality

    All the 14 principles must be used concurrently to make quality happen

    The quality principles apply to all types of businesses and organizations
    Deming’s 14 Quality Principles
    1. Create consistency of purpose in the company
    2. Learn the new philosophy
    3. Require statistical evidence of information technology quality
    4. Reduction in number of vendors
    5. Use statistical techniques to find sources of trouble
    6. Institute modern aids to training on the job
    7. Improve supervision
    8. Drive out fear
    9. Break down barriers between departments
    10. Eliminate numerical goals, slogans, pictures and posters
    11. Look carefully at work standards
    12. Institute a massive training program for employees
    13. Institute a vigorous program for retraining people in new skills
    14. Create a structure in top management that will push everyday on the above 13 points
    1. Create a consistency of purpose
    A consistency of purpose is required

    to keep the organization focused on quality objectives

    to make quality a cornerstone of the corporation

    to enable organizational alignment to goals and purposes

    to assure quality in products and services

    innovate new approaches
    deploy resources into research, education, maintenance
    2. Learn the new philosophy
    Learning the new philosophy involves:

    breaking away from strongly held work methods

    accepting that quality can be improved

    rejecting strongly held opinions

    accepting defective systems
    poor workmanship
    management methods

    realize that change is necessary to remain competitive
    3. Require statistical evidence of IT quality
    Learn to quantitative manage the process and product quality

    Learn the aspects of statistical control of quality

    Enable building the right quality characteristics without dependence on inspection

    Statistical evidence is the only way to objectively analyze quality of software


    4. Reduction in number of vendors

    Vendors who provide statistical evidence of quality are to be preferred

    A vendor who cannot provide statistical evidence of quality usually will have to chisel on his quality or go out of business

    A vendor who does not know his costs or whether he can repeat tomorrow today’s contribution of quality is not a good business partner
    5. Use statistical techniques to find sources of trouble
    Quantitatively understand process and product quality through statistical techniques

    Use statistical techniques to continuously improve quality and to remove the subjectiveness factor
    6. Institute modern aids to training on the job
    Reconstruct the training program using modern aids and technques

    Use statistical techniques to determine training requirements and effectiveness of training
    7. Improve supervision
    Supervision belongs to the system, and is the responsibility of the management

    Improve methods of supervising work performance

    Use statistical technques to guide through decisions

    Empower people to take charge of their responsibilities

    Use supervision as a guiding tool
    8. Drive out fear
    Eliminate “fear of the job” or “fear of the unknown” from the employees

    Encourage employees to ask questions and provide suggestions

    Empower employees to be innovative and creative

    Do not base appraisals based on defects
    9. Break down barriers between the departments
    Synergize departments together

    Enable a symbiotic relationship between diverse departments

    Enable effective interdepartment communication

    Enable cross-sharing of knowledge between departments and groups
    10. Eliminate numerical goals, slogans, pictures, and posters
    Elliminate unrealistic goals, picky slogans, pictures and posters

    Do not push the employees toward meeting fictious targets

    Do not let targets lead to frustration

    Posters and slogans have never helped people do a better job
    11. Look carefully at work standards
    Examine the work standards and how they encourage quality

    Eliminate redundant or obsolete work place rituals

    Establish a work culture that lead to a quality organization in a natural way
    12. Institute a massive training program for employees
    Institute a massive training program on simple but powerful statistical techniques for the employees

    Encourage people to participate in training efforts

    13. Institute a vigorous program for retraining people in new skills
    Establish training programs to enable people to update their skills

    Enable people to get trained on new technologies, methods, tools and processes
    14. Create a structure in top management to push other principles on a day-to-day basis
    Senior management must drive the quality consciousness

    Make maximum use of statistical knowledge and talent in the company

    Ensure that quality emanates from the top
    An NLP Approach to remembering the Principles
    Shivkumar

 

 

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