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  1. #1
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    Basic approach for a database driven webapp

    I need to start considering load and performance issues on a javascript/html based web app which runs off a sql/oracle back end which contain huge amounts of data.

    The question is; is the testing divided between the web server and the database? Kind of as a separate project? IE You find out the response times and max connections of the pure html pages (webserver) and then as another exercise you find out the same for the database.

    Or do these loadtesting products do it all in one go. eg. you to record a script, for example: logging in loading an account a updating some information, which essentially is hitting the db as well as the webserver.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Re: Basic approach for a database driven webapp

    Generally, first approach is followed for unit performance testing while second is for system performance testing. You can decide approach based on objective of load /performance testing & stage of your project.

  3. #3
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    Re: Basic approach for a database driven webapp

    I think when you use a load testing tool for doing the system performance testing it is giving you the combined result. As you will get response from the webserver only after processing from the database is completed.

    I am also interested to learn more on this topic.

  4. #4
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    Re: Basic approach for a database driven webapp

    Thanks, I guessed that they would, although I thought that some would maybe record the basic URL's and just call pages, thus not producing db hits to get a pure webserver performance figure. I have also seen some pure db performance tools also.

    Doing both seems like it could muddy the waters somewhat as the webserver would never be running off the same box as the db, I can see it complicating the results, especially if you wanted to estimate server requirements for both.

    I can see that I'm going to have to do far more research on this as I anticipated.

    Thanks.

  5. #5
    Moderator JakeBrake's Avatar
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    Re: Basic approach for a database driven webapp

    [ QUOTE ]
    Bill: …The question is; is the testing divided between the web server and the database? Kind of as a separate project? IE You find out the response times and max connections of the pure html pages (webserver) and then as another exercise you find out the same for the database.

    [/ QUOTE ]It depends both upon the tool and the questions your customers would like answered about performance. A typical starting point could be to model a “day-in-the-life” of the application as a system. How is it being used? How is it supposed to perform? How is it performing under stress conditions or at normal volumes for extended periods. More information can be found at this link and those links within:
    http://www.sqaforums.com/showflat.ph...=10#Post325218
    .
    .
    [ QUOTE ]
    Bill: Or do these loadtesting products do it all in one go. eg. you to record a script, for example: logging in loading an account a updating some information, which essentially is hitting the db as well as the webserver.

    [/ QUOTE ]As has been previously stated – yes. Sometimes you may have objectives that required targeted testing. An example might be a test that puts maximum load on a database. Perhaps a specific set of queries are required to stress a suspicious area and/or the entire application database where the webserver otherwise may not be able to tolerate the load you may need, or it is more convenient to go directly to the database. I know of a few tools that support this. I am not sure if all tools of the load-generating family support this out of the box.

 

 

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