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  1. #1
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    Questions about an ALM crash

    So ALM crashed Nov 17 2015. 170 some odd scripts and 8 years worth of work gone forever - I think. I have no control over ALM so I have to rely on my ALM admin - and she's not saying anything. She's blaming the IT department and IT is blaming her. From what I have been told there is a database backup and then a backup of ALM and the 2 backups must sync up for a time and date stamp.

    Is that right?
    If that is right, I totally don't understand because if there are 2 backups going on - how could they ever match on a time date stamp?

    Could any ALM admin out there fill me in on what's going on with an ALM crash and if the story I've been told makes any sense?

    Please.

    Can you feel my pain of 8 years of automation work by 10 people gone?

  2. #2
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    ALM stores data in two places. Some data is stored in a database. Other information is stored in the file system. The only way to get a completely accurate backup is to back up both areas at the same time when there is little to no activity.

    If you have the backups taken at nearly the same time, there may be few discrepancies, but it could be "close enough".

    The type of information stored in the file system is automated test scripts, attached files (like screen images), automated test results reports, and the UI workflow customizations.

    The type of information stored in the database is all the user accounts, all the manual test cases and test run data, requirements and defect data, the links between your domains, your projects, and your users, etc.

    If your backups of these two data sets are months apart, they may be too far out of synch to be useful. If they are days out of synch, they would still be useful for the historic data. Data that changed in the time between the backups would be the most at risk.
    Trudy C
    (Opinions and information contained in this post are wholly my own and do not reflect the opinions of my employer.)

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by tclasp View Post
    ALM stores data in two places. Some data is stored in a database. Other information is stored in the file system. The only way to get a completely accurate backup is to back up both areas at the same time when there is little to no activity.

    If you have the backups taken at nearly the same time, there may be few discrepancies, but it could be "close enough".

    The type of information stored in the file system is automated test scripts, attached files (like screen images), automated test results reports, and the UI workflow customizations.

    The type of information stored in the database is all the user accounts, all the manual test cases and test run data, requirements and defect data, the links between your domains, your projects, and your users, etc.

    If your backups of these two data sets are months apart, they may be too far out of synch to be useful. If they are days out of synch, they would still be useful for the historic data. Data that changed in the time between the backups would be the most at risk.
    So if the backups were 1-4 weeks apart, could there still be recovery?

    Isn't testing the backup part of the procedure?

  4. #4
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    There might be some recoverable data. It depends on how much and what type of data changed in that time period.

    Part of whose procedure? It should be part of your company's procedures to ensure that back-ups are taken at appropriate intervals, covering the appropriate scope, and that they can be successfully restored.
    Trudy C
    (Opinions and information contained in this post are wholly my own and do not reflect the opinions of my employer.)

 

 

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