SPONSORS:






User Tag List

Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Dislikes Dislikes:  0
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Pretoria
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Total Downloaded
    0

    Diffrence Test Plan & Test Strategy

    What is the difference between Test Plan and Test strategy.Should someone have a sample of both of the documents please post them to my email address.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    361
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Total Downloaded
    0

    Re: Diffrence Test Plan & Test Strategy

    A test strategy is often seen at a higher level. For example what is the strategy for an organisation, a department, a business line.

    A test plan is more at project level. And implements the test strategy for that specific project.
    In some cases, the test strategy needs to be more specific for the project, so you can have it a at a project level to. But in this case only deviations are indicated.

    No example immediately at hand that I can share, sorry.
    Kind regards,
    Steven Deneir
    www.geocities.com/belgiansqa

    Flowing water never goes bad; our door hubs never gather termites.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    5,338
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Total Downloaded
    0

    Re: Diffrence Test Plan & Test Strategy

    I have seen the opposite variation - where a test strategy is embedded in the test plan. If you consider the test plan as the who, what, when, where, how of the overall testing phase of a project, the strategy comes out of the what and when part of the test plan.

    I don't know if there is a right or wrong answer to this, as long as you cover both.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Basking Ridge, NJ USA
    Posts
    1,086
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Total Downloaded
    0

    Re: Diffrence Test Plan & Test Strategy

    There are many discussions on this topic within this forum.

    Here's one:

    http://www.qaforums.com/cgi-bin/foru...=004236#000000

    You can do an advanced search, select the General Discussion Forum, and search on the words "test plan."

    There's a ton of information and opinion on this topic!!!
    JRicardo
    Senior SQA Analyst

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    361
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Total Downloaded
    0

    Re: Diffrence Test Plan & Test Strategy

    Originally posted by Darrel Damon:
    I have seen the opposite variation - where a test strategy is embedded in the test plan.
    I don't know if there is a right or wrong answer to this, as long as you cover both.
    <font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica">Darrel,
    I've seen that to, and as I indicated in my previous post, a test strategy can be available at different levels within an organisation.

    When you look at it that a strategy describes what is the proposed/preferred way of working in an organisation (organizational test strategy), covering the important risks of the organisation, then the test plan becomes a lot easier - in the sense of less pages, not repeating the same parts for each and every test plan (with maybe some minor changes that then get overlooked).

    What is also interesting is that the training in the organisation can use the test strategy as a source. You can train a newcomer saying what is the normal way of testing is described in the organizational/departmental/... test strategy, and that the test plan will describe the deviations if any, or goes much more in detail if required - e.g. risks that are specific for the project, and how the test strategy will mitigate these risks.

    For example the organizational test strategy can describe an entire test methodology. In a specific project, some parts of that methodology might not be required, and/or some other points might be needed. And this I would describe in the project test plan.
    Kind regards,
    Steven Deneir
    www.geocities.com/belgiansqa

    Flowing water never goes bad; our door hubs never gather termites.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    5,338
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Total Downloaded
    0

    Re: Diffrence Test Plan & Test Strategy

    Steven,

    I like the way that you laid out the strategy in a different document. All the advantages you mention, about being able to minimize the test plan, use the document as a source for training, etc, are not insignificant. I like it.

    Being a contractor, however, it is easy to bring the horse to water, but much harder to make it drink, so to speak. I run into a lot of NIH - "not invented here". I can't tell you the number of times I have shown customers a better way and they have turned a blind eye to it because someone in authority has their own way of doing things. But, that is the life of contracting. Woe is me. The upside is that living in this world gives me a lot of source material for the "inane manager comments" thread. [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    Darrel

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    361
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Total Downloaded
    0

    Re: Diffrence Test Plan & Test Strategy

    Hi Darrel,

    I do understand what you're talking about, and believe me, it's not only when you are a contractor that these things happen... [img]images/icons/wink.gif[/img]
    Kind regards,
    Steven Deneir
    www.geocities.com/belgiansqa

    Flowing water never goes bad; our door hubs never gather termites.

  8. #8
    SQA Knight
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Elanora Heights, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    3,271
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Total Downloaded
    0

    Re: Diffrence Test Plan & Test Strategy

    Darrel Damon

    This really depends on the size of the project. For a simple/small project I would write one document that encompasses the strategy, resoucring (if required), types of testing, test task breakdown, test cases, release process, acceptance criteria...etc.

    On larger more complex projects I write a Master Test Plan/document which defines the strategy, resoucring (if required), types of testing, test task breakdown and then write several test plans to address the various systems/sub systems that have to be delt with and the detailed test cases for such.
    Robert Tehve
    rtehve@bigpond.com

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    12
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Total Downloaded
    0

    Re: Diffrence Test Plan & Test Strategy

    hi buddies,
    can some one answer me the difference between "project" & "product" testing?

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    pune
    Posts
    86
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Total Downloaded
    0

    Re: Diffrence Test Plan & Test Strategy

    HI
    I HAD FOLLOWING DESCRIPTION FOR YOUR QUESTION..HOPE IT WILL DO..
    "Product is a software that a Software Company decides
    to develop for its customers. I mean, Company comes up
    with a list of requirements (of course after studying
    customer needs), develops a software that addresses
    these requirements, and launches this "product" for
    sell for the customers. Note that this software is not
    intended to address specific needs of a individual
    customer. Product is normally targetted to address
    common requirements for the target customers. In this
    case, the Company decides the area in which is wants
    to work, which decides who its customers would be. For
    example, company like Microsoft can be called as a
    product based company.

    In case of Projects, a customer comes to a Software
    Company and says, "hey, I have these requirements, can
    you develop a software for me?". Company then develops
    a software which specifically addresses requirements
    of that particular customer. For example, I can go to
    a Project based company and say "I want to have a web
    site for my shop. Can you develop it for me?". This is
    a project for the company.

    So "for whom the software is developed" decides if it
    is a product or a project. If it is for a individual
    customer, its a project. If it can be sold to any
    customer who wants to use it, it is a product.
    "
    With regards,
    Gauri.

 

 
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO v2.0.36 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2016 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Resources saved on this page: MySQL 8.82%
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise v2.6.4 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2016 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.2.8 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2016 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBNominate (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2016 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2016 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Username Changing provided by Username Change (Free) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2016 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
BetaSoft Inc.
Digital Point modules: Sphinx-based search
All times are GMT -8. The time now is 04:29 AM.

Copyright BetaSoft Inc.