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  1. #1
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    How do I test Localized application

    Hi All,

    I have an application which is been translated to Japanese (or any target) language. How can I test the web page content which is been translated is correct or not.


    1) I want to make sure that whole page is translated to target language (Language conversion)
    2) Check the converted content is correct or not.ie.,
    check whether all words are in target language (say Japanese and not in other language)

    I have following question as well :

    - Does language pack for the Operating System takes care of translating specific application to foreign/target language or the respective product/application should have the language packs/translators/localizers...?

    - Are there any tools in the market which do this?

    Can someone please throw some light on these areas.


    Thanks,
    Venkat.

  2. #2
    Moderator Joe Strazzere's Avatar
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    Re: How do I test Localized application

    [ QUOTE ]
    How can I test the web page content which is been translated is correct or not.

    [/ QUOTE ]
    You must enlist the services of a human being fluent in the target language.

    [ QUOTE ]
    Does language pack for the Operating System takes care of translating specific application to foreign/target language or the respective product/application should have the language packs/translators/localizers...?

    [/ QUOTE ]
    The latter. Operating Systems don't translate the text in your application. You do.

    Operating Systems present localized text only in the parts of the system that are owned by the OS - some buttons, menus, folder names, etc. But your application must be translated by you.

    [ QUOTE ]
    Are there any tools in the market which do this?

    [/ QUOTE ]
    There are translation assistance tools available. But relying solely on such tools would be foolish - it would certainly result in a poor (probably embarrassingly poor) translation.

    There's no getting around it, Venkat. Localization (and localization testing) is not a quick and cheap proposition. It takes work, time, and money.

    http://strazzere.blogspot.com/2010/0...alization.html
    http://strazzere.blogspot.com/2010/0...as-aid-to.html
    Joe Strazzere
    Visit my website: AllThingsQuality.com to learn more about quality, testing, and QA!

  3. #3
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    Re: How do I test Localized application

    Thanks a lot Joe.

    But language expert looking at every corner of the translated application would be a tedious task if we are not relying on tools for checking the translated content.

    Is there any other way which could solve my purpose.

    Thanks,
    Venkat.

  4. #4
    Moderator Joe Strazzere's Avatar
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    Re: How do I test Localized application

    [ QUOTE ]
    But language expert looking at every corner of the translated application would be a tedious task if we are not relying on tools for checking the translated content.

    Is there any other way which could solve my purpose.

    [/ QUOTE ]
    Yes.

    Companies that perform localization as a business use a variety of home-grown tools that help make their experts more efficient at checking translation results. You could build your own tools as well, in order to avoid some of the tedium.

    Alternatively, you could rely on Google translations (http://translate.google.com) as the testing oracle. It's free and not at all tedious to use. Perhaps you'll be willing to live with the results without having someone who actually speaks the language check it for you.

    And of course you can make the job far less tedious - don't actually check the translation at all. Instead, you could look at the Japanese page, make sure it contains no English (if that is the original language), and call that "good enough".
    Joe Strazzere
    Visit my website: AllThingsQuality.com to learn more about quality, testing, and QA!

  5. #5
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    Re: How do I test Localized application

    Venkat, I guess you didn't like my response at http://www.sqaforums.com/showflat.ph...e=0#Post645242

    I would add that you don't necessarily need a "language expert." I do not consider myself an "expert" in the English language. But if someone were to ask me (hire me?) to review a web site translated into English, it wouldn't take me very long to find out whether it was reasonable or awful (depending on the size of the site, of course).

    I liked Joe's last paragraph. I'm sure he was somewhat tongue-in-cheek at that point, because "good enough" translation can can leave some bizarre (perhaps even offensive or obscene) errors.

    You seem to be looking for the "magic bullet." There isn't one. You need to decide how "good" the translation needs to be, and use appropriate resources to achieve that goal.

  6. #6
    Moderator Joe Strazzere's Avatar
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    Re: How do I test Localized application

    [ QUOTE ]
    I liked Joe's last paragraph. I'm sure he was somewhat tongue-in-cheek at that point, because "good enough" translation can can leave some bizarre (perhaps even offensive or obscene) errors.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    I was being somewhat tongue-in-cheek, but the point still applies. If the correctness of the translation isn't very important (or isn't important at all), consider not doing any testing.

    The same point applies to any software development exercise - if you don't care that the results are correct, consider not testing.

    As you say, if you do care, then think about how much you care. And let the risk of an incorrect translation drive your approach to testing.
    Joe Strazzere
    Visit my website: AllThingsQuality.com to learn more about quality, testing, and QA!

 

 

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